San Diego Criminal Defense

101 W. Broadway, Suite 1770 | San Diego, CA 92101

This site is for information only. Use of this website does not create an attorney client relationship. This site is not legal advice. Legal advice is specific direction related to the unique circumstances of your legal issue. This website is not a substitute for a consultation with a California licensed criminal defense attorney. We invite you to contact us with any legal or criminal defense question you might have. 

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San Diego Criminal Lawyer

Award Winning Juvenile Criminal Defense Attorney

Award-winning San Diego criminal defense attorney Nicholas Moore has worked with hundreds of juveniles, guiding them through the complexities of our legal system and ultimately leading to positive behavioral outcomes. 

San Diego Criminal Lawyer
San Diego Criminal Defense Attorney Nicholas Moore

Nicholas J. Moore

San Diego Criminal Lawyer

Experienced San Diego Juvenile Defense Lawyer

When your child is in trouble, there is no substitute for experience.  With experience comes the peace of mind of knowing that your child's future is safe and that their rights are protected. 

 

Nicholas Moore has a long history of working with at-risk youth in San Diego.  As a member of the Mission Valley YMCA's Board of Directors, and Lead Advisor of the Youth & Government program, Nicholas has worked with hundreds of at-risk youth in and out of the legal system - providing opportunities for volunteerism, and positive behavioral changes. 

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Most Common Types of Juvenile Crimes

Explained by a San Diego Criminal Lawyer

 

Below is a summary of some of the most commonly charged driving crimes. If you would like to know what rights you have when you are being pulled over, click here or visit our FAQ page. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol Offenses

"Minor in Possession"

Minor DUI

 

Alcohol offenses are by far the most common offenses charged against juveniles, and a "minor in possession" is a misdemeanor. Often times parents can be charged as a result of their child's possession of alcohol under Penal Code 272 PC - Contributing to the deliquncy of a minor, Business & Professions Code 25658.2 - Allowing children to consume alcohol in your home, and other crimes that could potentially lead to felony charges. Depending on the specific facts of your case, you or your child may be facing serious fines and possibly jail time. It is possible for first time offenders to receive community service and a fine. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disorderly Conduct

Penal Code 647 PC

Penal Code 415 PC

Penal Code 404 PC

 

Cal. Penal Code § 415

In California, it is illegal for non-students to fight, make loud and unreasonable noise, and use offensive words on school property or grounds. This offense is a misdemeanor, and penalties include a fine of up to $400, up to 90 days in jail, or both. Increased penalties may apply to second and subsequent convictions.

 

Cal. Penal Code § 647

Disorderly conduct is catch-all for bad juvenile behavior, and a misdemeanor. Penalties for disorderly conduct include a fine of up to $1,000, up to six months in jail, or both. There may be increased penalties for second and subsequent convictions.

 

Cal. Penal Code § 404

We should encourage our students to learn how to lawfully protest, however students and juveniles need to be aware that in California, it is illegal for two or more people to assemble to disturb the peace and refuse to comply with a lawful order by a law enforcement officer to disperse.

 

Refusal to disperse after a lawful police order is a misdemeanor. Penalties include court costs, fines, restitution (paying for damage caused by the crime) or community service. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theft - Larceny - "Shoplifting"

Penal Code 488 PC

Penal Code 487 PC

 

Cal. Penal Code § 488 - Petty Theft:

Petty theft is a misdemeanor offense and applies when the value of property or money stolen is less than $400. Because it is a misdemeanor, the punishment for petty theft is up to 1 year in jail, and a $1,000 fine, plus restitution and court costs. Something as simple as taking another students' backpack may be enough for a criminal charge under this statute. 

 

Cal. Penal Code § 484 - Grand Theft (over $950):

Grand theft law comes into play when the value of the property or money taken exceeds $950. If a juvenile is falsely accused of steaing another students' backpack, and the backpack contains an expensive laptop or smart phone - they could very easily be looking at a Grand Theft charge. Under Prop 47, a lot of theft charges are being routinely punished as misdemeanors, and in San Diego, there is a process called community court whereby you can avoid jail time - however that misdemeanor is on your record and if you're a student with ambitious to obtain a professional license in your future - that charge can come back to haunt you. 

 

Protect your student's stellar record and call an experienced San Diego juvenile defense lawyer immediately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Assault & Battery

Penal Code 240 PC

Penal Code 242 PC

 

Fighting is still common in schools, for better or for worse. Unfortunately, students swept up in the conflict can find themselves facing assault & battery charges. Having an assault or battery charge on your record at an early age can make it a certainty that there will be little to no lieniecy if you have to face a court later on in life. An experienced San Diego criminal lawyer can usually talk a DA down from filing a misdemeanor to filing treating school-age hijinx as an infraction that won't affect a students' ability to get a job or get into the college of their choice. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vandalism

Penal Code 594 PC

 

Vandalism is defined as the malicious destruction of property. Vandalism is typically a misdemeanor, but may be charged as a wobbler depending on the dollar value of the property that was damaged. This means that if expensive property was vandalized, the crime could potentially be charged as a felony - and the penalty could be up to three years in jail and/or a 10,000 fine. If your son or daughter has been charged with vandalism, hiring an attorney is the best way to protect their future.